Military Monday; Canadian CWGC Commemoration

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records 2,856 locations in Canada where they have memorials to 18,851 war dead.

Row Labels FWW Casualties SWW Casualties Total Casualties
Alberta 432 644 1076
British Columbia 751 740 1491
Manitoba 669 553 1222
New Brunswick 328 287 615
Newfoundland and Labrador 131 347 480
Nova Scotia 1013 3469 4482
Ontario 2741 3556 6298
Prince Edward Island 85 100 185
Quebec 956 1055 2011
Saskatchewan 367 632 999
Yukon Territory 0 2 2
Grand Total 7473 11385 18861

For both wars, Ontario has the most commemorations, followed by Nova Scotia and Quebec.

The Halifax Memorial commemorates 3,141 Canadian and Newfoundland sailors, merchant seamen, soldiers and nursing sisters who lost their lives at sea, and also bears the names of men of the Canadian Army stationed in Canada who have no known grave, most from the SWW.

The Ottawa Memorial commemorates 820 commemorates men and women who lost their lives while serving or training with the Air Forces of the Commonwealth in Canada, the West Indies and the United States and who have no known grave.

There are 1,726 Canadian locations with a single burial.

896 locations in Ontario have CWGC commemoration, 622 for the First World War, 541 for the SWW.

Cemetery First World War Casualties Second World War Casualties Total Casualties
OTTAWA MEMORIAL 0 820 820
TORONTO (PROSPECT) CEMETERY 400 248 648
TORONTO (MOUNT PLEASANT) CEMETERY 125 105 230
OTTAWA (BEECHWOOD) CEMETERY 99 113 212
KITCHENER (WOODLAND) CEMETERY 40 162 202
TORONTO (ST. JOHN’S NORWAY) CEMETERY 118 79 197
TORONTO (MOUNT HOPE) CEMETERY 79 73 152
KINGSTON (CATARAQUI) CEMETERY 61 85 146
LONDON (MOUNT PLEASANT) CEMETERY 97 44 141
HAMILTON CEMETERY 128 12 140
OTTAWA NOTRE DAME CEMETERY 42 73 115

 

One Reply to “Military Monday; Canadian CWGC Commemoration”

  1. Gravenhurst, Ontario had, until recently had burials of four World War I soldiers deemed to be KIA as the result of disease. Because Gravenhurst had four Sanatoriums for the treatment of tuberculosis including the first in Canada and the first free san in the world a number of soldiers were sent here for treatment of TB, or trench lung, or the effects of poison gas attacks and who died here both during and after the war. As these men died, their bodies were usually brought home by their families for burial. But four were buried here. Then about 3 years ago, another man was tracked down and discovered to be buried here in an unmarked but recorded gravesite — a man who had emigrated from England just prior to the War and who had been diagnosed with TB and sent back to Canada for treatment. The town in England from which he came had been looking for all of their fallen sons, and he was the last to be tracked — to Gravenhurst. The CWGC paid to have a stone erected on his grave — a grave which sits in a little grove of other fallen WWI soldiers. I was there to be with him when his stone was installed. I am hoping still to have a CWGC ceremony to accord him the respect he is due — and to have with us a relative from England — once CWGC determines when that will happen.

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